Energy efficient buildings, cases

Innovative facade concepts are today more relevant than ever. The demand for natural ventilation in commercial buildings is increasing due to growing environmental consciousness while at the same time energy consumption for buildings has to be reduced. An advanced facade should allow for a comfortable indoor climate, sound protection and good lighting, thus minimising the demand for auxiliary energy input. Double skin facades (DSF) have become a major architectural element in office buildings over the last 15 years.
Post date: 6 Apr 2010
Type: Link

Building size -54,000 square feet Building details - Ten stories of office space Main floor of retail and restaurant space Building height - 110 feet Total building cost - 7 million euros (6.3 million GBP)
Post date: 26 Mar 2010
Type: Case

Post date: 26 Mar 2010
Type: Case

The dimensions of the building were calculated to facilitate reductions in energy requirements. Office buildings are customarily 18 m or 20 m deep. Yet daylight effectively penetrates only the first 5 or 6 metres of office space. It was therefore decided that for Green Office® more than half the floors would be no more than 13.5 m deep: 6 m of office space on each facade, with a 1.5 m wide corridor at the centre. On the deeper floors (18.50 m) the central area is occupied by plant rooms, washrooms, tea rooms, etc.).
Post date: 26 Mar 2010
Type: Case

Post date: 26 Mar 2010
Type: Case

Post date: 17 Mar 2010
Type: Publication

This Compendium aims to create a better understanding of the issues surrounding the achievement and delivery of zero carbon housing, improve the quality of the debate, and set out a basis for better international comparisons and collaboration. This document clearly sets out comparable data across an interesting set of case studies, perhaps highlighting the need for a harmony
Post date: 17 Mar 2010
Type: Publication

Post date: 17 Mar 2010
Type: Tool

The system is based on concentrated solar power technology, in which parabola-shaped troughs concentrate the sun's rays on to a receiver that converts the solar energy into heat. A tracking mechanism allows these devices to follow the sun as it moves across the sky. Currently, concentrated solar power technologies are deployed in large plants where they generate enough power for thousands of homes. However, recent technological advances mean that it is now possible to develop small-scale systems that can be fitted to individual buildings.
Post date: 16 Mar 2010
Type: News