fuel poverty

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INSEE Première - N° 1351 - Mai 2011
Post date: 5 Jul 2011
Type: Publication

In the framework of this report, a household is said to be in fuel poverty if it needs to spend more than 10 per cent of its income on fuel to maintain an adequate level of warmth (usually defined as 21 degrees for the main living area, and 18 degrees for other occupied rooms).
Post date: 21 Oct 2010
Type: Publication

This report includes the following highlights:In 2008, there were around 4.5m fuel poor households in the UK, up from 4.0m in 2007. In England, there were around 3.3m fuel poor households up from 2.8m in 2007. The increase in fuel poverty between 2007 and 2008 was largely caused by rising fuel prices, which have risen by an average of 80 per cent between 2004 and 2008. Rising incomes and improvements in the energy efficiency of housing continue to help households from falling into fuel poverty and in some cases have removed households from fuel poverty.
Post date: 21 Oct 2010
Type: News

The Committee's report is a stocktake of performance in tackling fuel poverty and sets out areas of concern which the Committee want to see addressed in the new Parliament.  Paddy Tipping MP, Acting Chair of the Committee, said "one of the reasons tackling fuel poverty is so difficult, is that the Government does not have a clear idea about who the fuel poor are.  Because it does not have that information, it has to use age and receipt of benefits as proxies for fuel poverty, and that means that some people who are fuel poor do not get help, while others who are not in fuel poverty...
Post date: 6 Apr 2010
Type: News

The number of French households concerned by fuel poverty is estimated to 3.4 millions, including 425 000 households most exposed. The fuel poverty affects primarily rural zones and small towns. The consequences are environmental (risk of poisoning, moisture, mold), health (respiratory diseases and winter mortality) and social (stress, withdrawal). The report agrees that much is done by many actors with many tools but with a curative approach while the focus should be on prevention.
Post date: 3 Feb 2010
Type: News