energy assessment / audit

For instance: in EN ISO 13789 the subscripts for transmission and ventilation are T and V in ISO and tr and ve in CEN. There may be two reasons: 1) because the EN ISO standard was already published before the common symbols were agreed upon in CEN (which was in 2007); 2) because the ISO standard is closely linked to other ISO standards which use different symbols. Question submitted by: Dick van Dijk (TNO, The Netherlands) Anwered by: Dick van Dijk, TNO and Jaap Hogeling, ISSO (The Netherlands) Date: 29/04/2009
Post date: 29 Apr 2009
Type: Ask the Experts

The developed standards reflect the requirements of the EPBD as given in the different articles and the annex. The procedures as given in the standards meet the essential requirements as set out by the EPBD. Note that the EPBD is an example of the application of the principles of subsidiarity and proportionality: general principles are established at Community level, but the detailed implementation are left to Member States, thus allowing each Member State to choose the regime which corresponds best to its particular situation.
Post date: 29 Apr 2009
Type: Ask the Experts

Today most companies (consultants, manufacturers and contractors) work internationally. From their point of view it is preferable to have internationally accepted calculation methods and input data for the energy efficiency of buildings and building systems. European standards should therefore form the basis of any revision of national building codes. The IEE CENSE project (www.iee-cense.eu) will interact with all partners (building code writers, consultants, manufacturers, educational institutions, etc.).
Post date: 29 Apr 2009
Type: Ask the Experts

It is a fact that in general most of the preparatory work in the Technical Committees and working groups in CEN is in English. The underlying documentation and the preliminary drafts are in English. When publishing a draft standard (prEN), it is up to DIN (German NSB) and AFNOR (French NSB) to decide if they want to translate and provide CEN with a German or French version. The time schedules allow for 2 months to make this translation available. It is up to the so called National Standards Bodies (NSBs) to decide if other national language versions will be produced.
Post date: 29 Apr 2009
Type: Ask the Experts

General
Post date: 29 Apr 2009
Type: Ask the Experts

Standards are copyright protected property of the publisher (CEN , ISO etc.) and not part of the public domain. Question submitted by: Dick van Dijk (TNO, The Netherlands) Anwered by: Dick van Dijk, TNO and Jaap Hogeling, ISSO (The Netherlands) Date: 2008/03/10
Post date: 29 Apr 2009
Type: Ask the Experts

In particular in the context of building regulations it is essential that a prescribed method is verifiable and legally secure and that there is consensus on the procedures. Therefore, transparency, robustness and reproducibility are important quality aspects which may hinder the choice of a detailed simulation tool. An overview of advantages and disadvantages of different types of methods, depending on the application, is given in the Buildings Platform Information Paper P026 which can be downloaded from the BUILD UP Portal.
Post date: 29 Apr 2009
Type: Ask the Experts

Yes, but some of the required input data may not be available at reasonable costs. For those cases default values may be provided at national level, e.g. as function of type and age of construction. Question submitted by: Dick van Dijk (TNO, The Netherlands) Anwered by: Dick van Dijk, TNO and Brian Anderson, BRE (UK) Date: 19/02/2009
Post date: 19 Feb 2009
Type: Ask the Experts

If an ISO (International Organization for Standardization) standard is also an EN ISO standard, then it is a European standard just like any other EN (European) standard. As illustrated in several CENSE Information Papers, e.g. P92 or P94, a CEN standard to support the EPBD is one of a series of standards, which are mutually related and serve particular European (EPBD) needs; in particular: which are meant to be applied in the context of national building regulations.
Post date: 19 Feb 2009
Type: Ask the Experts

Heat is lost from a building or building part by transmission or ventilation, as a result of a positive temperature difference between the indoor and outdoor (or other) environment. However, if the indoor temperature of the considered building or building part is lower than the temperature of the other environment (outdoor environment or another building part), the heat loss becomes negative. Therefore the more neutral term “heat transfer” was introduced from the 2007 versions of the EPBD related standards on.
Post date: 18 Feb 2009
Type: Ask the Experts