Practices

The Commission is in the process of updating some of the content on this website in light of the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union. If the site contains content that does not yet reflect the withdrawal of the United Kingdom, it is unintentional and will be addressed.

CHH – ChristophorusHaus MIVA, Stadl-Paura, Austria

Share this Post:

The principal objective of the design was to reduce energy demand to ‘passivhaus’ standards, with the remaining energy demand covered as far as possible from renewable sources, while simultaneously providing occupants with a high standard of comfort. Heating loads were minimized by the use of a high level of insulation and limited glazing area with the aim of reducing heating consumption to 15 kWh/m². Infiltration losses were reduced by designing for an air tightness of 0.6 ach at 50 Pa. Heating is supplied using an air distribution system and ceiling panels in the office and seminar rooms, supplemented by underfloor heating in the atrium area. The air supply system, incorporates heat recovery in the form of air to air heat exchangers, with efficiencies in the range 78% to 86%. The heating systems are supplied with water heated by a heat pump (43 kW; COP = 4) which uses water circulated through pipes in deep boreholes as its source. In summer, cooling is provided by circulating this water through the ceiling panels and heat exchangers in the air supply system. Additional reduction in peak summer temperatures is achieved by using high thermal mass in the interior of the building and night-time natural ventilation. In addition domestic hot water is served by 5 m² solar collector. Photovoltaic collectors on the façade and roof provide 9.8 kWpeak electricity.
The building was completed in 2003 and serves a missionary organisation dispatching goods to developing countries. Its use is multifunctional, serving to provide office accommodation, seminar rooms, restaurant and exhibition facilities, warehousing and a loading bay. It consists of three floors and a basement. Office and public areas are occupied by 40 people and have an area of 1 215 m². The remaining building area is used for parking vehicles (325 m²) and a basement (550 m²). The building is semi-circular with a central atrium.

Acronym of the case

AdVent Case 11

Author(s) information

Name

Per Heiselberg

Address

Aalborg University

Email

Name

O Kalyanova

Address

Aalborg University

Email

Lessons learnt

The successful outcome of the project showed the importance of integrating the work of the design team at an early stage and coordinating all aspects that related to energy consumption. The project also demonstrated the need to ensure that the design matched closely the expected pattern of use of the building. Other lessons included: -Sensor-controlled lighting and shading devices are very efficient in ensuring optimum use of daylight - The use of a ventilation system controlled by CO2 sensors provides a high level of air quality - It is important to ensure that the ventilation and heating systems are turned off during periods when the building is not occupied - Systems should be monitored on a 24 hour basis so that action can be taken by in the event of a problem occurring - Continuous monitoring of the energy used by the building enables. Monitoring of the whole energy system is very useful to find out if the design of the building and its energy supply worked well

Award labels

Additional documents

Available link languages

Topic