Practices

Warsaw - Powering the city through cogeneration

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Warsaw - cogeneration

Warsaw - cogeneration

Energy specialists call the combined use of heat and power cogeneration. Warsaw’s cogeneration consists of using the heat that is produced during electricity production in power plants for heating buildings and water, instead of treating it as waste. Warsaw has one of the largest cogeneration systems in Europe, with 1700 km of pipes supplying 76% of the city’s heating demand. The use of cogeneration leads to a reduction of coal consumption, which is still widely used in power plants, by consolidating heat and power generation into one plant. Increasingly, Warsaw’s cogeneration plants are now also being supplied by biomass. Conversions are being made to existing structures to accommodate the use of biomass and the city anticipates a biomass share of 15% of combusted fuels by 2020. Cogeneration is also used in the municipal solid waste incineration plant ZUSOK, which will be extended, while construction of another such plant is planned. As a result, in 2020 the share of renewable energy from solid waste should reach 8%. All measures contribute to Warsaw’s efforts as a signatory to the Covenant of Mayors to reduce CO2 emissions.

As a signatory to the ambitious Covenant of Mayors initiative, and as part of its ongoing commitment to reducing carbon emissions, Warsaw is addressing a number of issues including promoting energy-efficient vehicles and renewable energy resources, but is also turning to cogeneration to supply the city with heat and power.

Warsaw's cogeneration consists of using the heat that is produced during electricity production in power plants for heating buildings and water, instead of treating it as waste and dissipating it in warm water that is channelled to nearby reservoirs. Energy specialists call this combined heat and power (CHP) cogeneration.

There are two main CHP plants in Warsaw, Siekierki and Zeran - which produce in total 3640 MWt of heat and 970 MWe of power per year - as well as two heat plants, Kaweczyn and Wola - which produce 930 MWt of heat. Warsaw has one of the largest cogeneration systems in Europe, with 1700 km of pipes supplying 76% of the city's building and water heating demands.

Cogeneration gives Warsaw an extra 3.5 TWh of energy every year, and it is estimated that by producing the power and heat together, the city saves two million tonnes of CO2 emissions annually.

The city of Warsaw is stepping its efforts even further up by adapting its heat and power network to accommodate the use of bio fuels. Plants such as Zeran and Siekierki are being fitted with measures which will allow them to use bio fuels in place of traditional fossil fuels for producing electricity. It is envisaged that Warsaw will achieve a biomass share of 15% of combusted fuels by 2020.

Cogeneration is also used in municipal solid waste incineration plant ZUSOK, which will be extended, while construction of another such plant is planned. As a result, in 2020 the share of renewable energy from solid waste should reach 8%.

With its massive CO2 emissions savings and its large dimension, CHP cogeneration plays an important role in Warsaw's efforts to meet its commitments in the Covenant of Mayors.

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Warsaw - cogeneration

Lessons learnt

Cogeneration gives Warsaw an extra 3.5 TWh of energy every year, and it is estimated that by producing the power and heat together, the city saves two million tonnes of CO2 emissions annually. With its massive CO2 emissions savings and its large dimension, CHP cogeneration plays an important role in Warsaw's efforts to meet its commitments in the Covenant of Mayors.

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“For the future Warsaw decision makers opt for more decentralised cogeneration, which also secures basic energy provision in case of a blackout in the centralised electro-energetic grid. An upgrade to trigeneration (producing also cooling energy from the previously generated heat for needs of house cooling systems) is also considered for implementation.” Jarosław Kochaniak, Deputy Mayor of Warsaw

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