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EC Report: Progress by MS on cost-optimal levels of energy performance

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Report from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council - COM(2016) 464 final

 

This report by the European Commission reviews the progress achieved by Member States (MS) in reaching the cost-optimal levels of minimum energy performance requirements for new and existing buildings, and also for building elements. The report fulfills the obligation upon the Commission to report to the European Parliament and the Council on the use of the delegated powers referred to in Article 5(4) and Article 23 of Directive 2010/31/EU on the energy performance of buildings (EPBD). The report will also inform the ongoing review of the Directive, which is an action point of the energy union framework strategy.

 

The provisions for calculating cost-optimal levels as the basis for setting and reviewing the minimum energy performance requirements at national and regional levels are a key element of the EPBD. Article 4(1) of the Directive requires that MS ensure that minimum energy performance requirements for buildings or building units are set according to cost-optimal levels. Article 5 sets out the framework methodology, the obligation of MS to report the calculations to the Commission, and the Commission’s obligation to report to the European Parliament and the Council on progress by MS.

 

The calculation of the cost-optimal levels includes several steps:

 

  • definition of reference buildings;
  • identification of energy efficiency and renewable energy measures;
  • calculation of primary energy demand;
  • calculation of global costs; and
  • calculation of the cost-optimal levels and the gap, if any, between the cost-optimal levels and minimum energy performance requirements

 

Conclusions

 

The cost-optimal calculations have shown that there is still a significant potential for cost-effective energy savings that can be achieved by bridging the gap between the current minimum requirements and cost-optimal levels.

 

For the first time, a benchmarking framework based on the cost-optimal methodology proposed in the Directive and the Regulation was used. This enabled the comparison and combination of various energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. This work supported national authorities in their task of setting realistic minimum energy performance requirements for buildings and in preparing the ground for meeting the targets for nearly zero- energy buildings. This ultimately contributed to boosting overall ambition levels across the EU towards the technical and economic energy-saving potential in the buildings sector, also envisaged in the forward-looking strategies for building renovation published under Article 4 of the Energy Efficiency Directive. However, the potential of different types of renewable energy could have been better explored in the calculations, and better statistical information on national building stocks could be sought.

 

The Commission will fully use its powers under the Treaty to ensure that the Directive on the energy performance of buildings is correctly implemented. This includes achieving the cost-optimal levels of minimum energy performance requirements, within the indicated timeline, to ensure that the EU’s longer-term energy and climate objectives, and the contribution of the building sector to meeting those objectives, are fulfilled.

 

 

To download the report, please visit the relevant EUR-Lex webpage at the link below.