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Life-cycle cost and environmental assessment of nearly zero-energy buildings (NZEBs) in four European countries

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IOP publishing of the paper 'Life-cycle cost and environmental assessment of nearly zero-energy buildings (NZEBs) in four European countries'

IOP publishing of the paper 'Life-cycle cost and environmental assessment of nearly zero-energy buildings (NZEBs) in four European countries'

The CoNZEBs project formed the main part of a session at the IAQVEC conference in Bari in September 2019. CoNZEBs project partner held in total 6 presentations including a project overview, different project results and one of the national exemplary NZEB buildings presented in the end-user brochure. The papers are published as open source documents in IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, Volume 609.

 

The paper 'Life-cycle cost and environmental assessment of nearly zero-energy buildings (NZEBs) in four European countries' summarises the efforts and outcomes of the CoNZEBs work on the assessment of the identified alternative NZEB solution sets with lower investment costs regarding their life-cycle costs and life-cycle impact.

 

The paper with the doi 10.1088/1757-899X/609/7/072005 is available as open access at IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, volume 609 and at the CoNZEBs website.

 

Abstract:

 

Nearly zero energy buildings (NZEBs) are required as the minimum standard for all new buildings in Europe by January 2021. These buildings should, according to the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD), be cost optimal, i.e. the cost of constructing and operating the building over its lifetime should be at its minimum. The EU Horizon 2020 research project CoNZEBs, identify and assess technology solution sets that lead to significant cost reductions of new NZEBs in four EU member states. The project initially identified baseline costs for minimum energy performance buildings, NZEB and beyond NZEB in the four countries and then a number of solution sets with lower investment costs than those of typical NZEBs. The next step was to carry out life cycle cost and environmental assessment analyses on the identified solution sets and compare these to minimum energy performance, typical NZEB and beyond NZEB buildings. The results of this work for one of the countries – Denmark – is presented in the paper as an example.

 

Disclaimer:

 

The CoNZEBs project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no. 754046. The paper reflects the authors’ views. The Commission is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information it contains.

 

In Germany, national co-funding is provided by Bundesministerium für Umwelt, Naturschutz, Bau und Reaktorsicherheit within the research initiative Zukunft Bau (SWD-10.08.18.7-17.33).